Pool resources for barn fire fighting

The loss of much of the next generation of the Hermes Dairy Farm's herd and the loss of 150 pigs in a barn fire near Green Springs a
Sandusky Register Staff
May 9, 2010

The loss of much of the next generation of the Hermes Dairy Farm's herd and the loss of 150 pigs in a barn fire near Green Springs are symptoms of what the state fire marshal's office is calling a growing problem in Ohio.

But it's more than a building that goes up. It's the underpinning for a local economy. Say what you want about manufacturing, tech and tourism; enough of the local economy is agricultural that it makes a difference when a barn is lost.

Which makes the prevention and fighting of such fires more than a passing concern.

Here's another way the regionalism we push so insistently can come into play.

Absent a steady and sufficient source of water to fight a fire, firefighters have to take their water with them to a barn fire. Local fire departments have their tanker trucks, of course, and there are the "portable ponds" which can be set up to hold enough water to keep the pressure on a fire, but it seems there isn't always enough. Conversely, though, barn fires don't happen often enough to make it cost effective for each rural department to

Comments

Anonymous

Pooling resources is an excellent way to maximize firefighting capabilities in rural areas. The cost savings in not duplicating equipment is obvious, and joint training on all the strategically located equipment will have all the departments able to work together efficiently.

In addition, when it comes to rural water supply the best way to maximize effectiveness is to increase the number of farm ponds and require a dry hydrant system. However, the most important water supply any livestock facility can have is a sprinkler system, and even if there is no city water supply, farm ponds can be the “holding tank” for either wet or dry systems.

NFPA 150 Standard, Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities, provides requirements that may affect structures in your jurisdictions. Visit the NFPA website at www.nfpa.org, and find information about fire safety in horse barns at www.laurieloveman.com .