Lions Park breakwater in need of repair

While a century-old stone structure at Lions Park continues to deteriorate, city officials said they need grant dollars to fix it.
Andy Ouriel
Dec 26, 2012

 

Tim Schwanger, a vocal proponent for shoreline preservation, wants the city to prioritize fixes for the breakwater at Lions Park, if only to safeguard the park and nearby homes.
The breakwater is designed to prevent wave erosion of the shoreline by waves, but it’s long been compromised. It pretty much sits underwater these days, failing to keep waves from crashing on the shore. It’s also a hazard for boaters and wind surfers navigating the waters.
 
City planners have pinpointed Lions Park as a home for Sandusky’s first public beach, but with a shoreline thinner than new-wave computers, it’s virtually impossible for anyone to sprawl out on a towel or play football on the sand.
 
Schwanger said he’d like to see the city enhance the breakwater through a “no-cost removal of non-native shoreline debris.” 
 
This would give visitors easy access to the park’s beach, and they could venture into knee-deep water without fear of injury, Schwanger said.
 
Schwanger has repeatedly asked the city to rebuild the breakwater. 
 
“A (breakwater) protects the beach from further erosion and ensures the land doesn’t get swallowed up,” he said. “All we need is the city manager to agree to apply for a permit to do work in the water. This plan would allow the beach to re-establish naturally.”
 
Read more about the breakwater in today's Register or epaper.

Comments

totallyamazed

.
.
This is a "no brainer" for the city. The city has made the effort to remove the cement and rock from the shoreline and created a nice slope to the water's edge. Without protection continuous waves from northwest winds will erode it. This could be a really nice park/beach area for west end residence.

Would I stick my head in the water....? Not on your life.
.
.

Trigger from Erie

This headline makes my head hurt. How in the world can we expect children to learn proper grammar when this is the example adults are setting?

AJ Oliver

A lot of people have worked hard on the Lions Park re-do for our West End peeps - Dave Waddington, Richard Brady, Tim Schwanger and many others. Hats off to them all. (I think the headline is PA grammar, as in "needs washed".)

The Answer Person

The whole concept of this group putting a bathing beach in that sewer water continues to astonish me. My parents forbade us to swim in the Bay because of its' totally unhealthy condition which continues to this day. Farm run-off and sewerage. Sharon is ragging about the money being lost at the new marina, yet WHO will pay for lifeguards etc at this public beach? So will this be yet another of thier loser projects and then complain it doesn't make a profit? Will the Watchdog group be there in the water with their Speedos on opening day? Doubt it.

T. A. Schwanger

Ah yes the Anwer Person. Where ya been? Allow me to answer your concerns.

First recall the water and sediment was tested for contaminants and were found to be clean.

SOSP in not advocating an all out swimming beach. But, sure would be nice to get to knee deep water without fear of injury. No need for lifeguards.

There are two separate issues with the Lion's Park shoreline.

Top of the priority list is the condition of the shoreline. Blacktop, steel piping, concrete, bricks and other non-native debris litter the shorline. By todays standards, these items are illegal as erosion control devices. Removal is a simple, no cost initiative. All that is needed is a no cost, Corp of Engineers permit authorizd by the City Manager. SOSP advised the City Manager we are willing to work with City crews and other volunteers to clear the shoreline. Keep an eye on the local newspaper next spring for shoreline cleanup dates. You are welcome to participate. Speedos not required.

Second on the priority list is rebuild of the breakwater, as money comes available, to protect the shoreline. The half submerged breakwater has become a hazard to navigation with reports of boaters and sailboarders damaging their crafts.