REGISTER VIEWPOINT: State's future part of city's future

From first-run movies to opera broadcasts to putting "Gilligan's Island" on the stage, the State Theatre is trying to be s
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

From first-run movies to opera broadcasts to putting "Gilligan's Island" on the stage, the State Theatre is trying to be something for everyone.

It has to be.

Regrets to the few people left who wanted the venerable old pile at Columbus and Water streets to be a bastion of high culture for the benighted citizenry, but that's what the State has to do to survive as a cultural entity.

And, by extension, it's what the State has to do for the Sandusky area to survive as a cultural, economic and social entity.

We've noted before in this space, and it's been reinforced to us again, that the name of the game in attracting high-paying technological jobs to this area is to make the area attractive to the young, educated people who would fill those jobs.

And the rules, apparently, have changed: Those of us who remember having to "go where the jobs are" are somewhat taken aback by companies who chase down young, talented people and want to relocate where such people congregate.

And such people congregate where there are interesting things to do after hours, beyond getting hammered on the cheap stuff.

And, because the State is -- and has been -- trying to reinvent itself in a town where new-fangled, highfalutin' ideas don't go over, no how, it requires a healthy dose of lowbrow to carry the highbrow.

That's not to say first-run movies and even "Gilligan's Island" are anything to be looked down upon; some things are just fun and we remember, as we cram ourselves into the multiplexes with plasma-TV-sized screens, what fun it was to watch a movie on the State's giant screen.

Besides, the State has to offer a variety to get the maximum number of butts in seats, paying the bills until the cultural stuff can carry itself as the number of people here who want to see it, grows.

In classic terms, it's a bootstrap situation. Young, educated people mean support for a cultural life, but we need a cultural life to attract (or keep) young, educated people. And the State is part of that economic wheel.