Sexism in Blue Streak sports

Our daughter has played one or more sports since she was in first grade and has been treated differently than the boys from the begi
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

Our daughter has played one or more sports since she was in first grade and has been treated differently than the boys from the beginning.

She had to play softball on poor city fields. As a basketball player she had to learn along with 40 or more girls in the fifth grade, scrambled to get one to two practice days a week in the late evenings at the high school auxiliary gym. In the seventh grade the girls only had about 10 days to practice and learn before the first game. Eighth grade had us sharing coaches with the boy’s team forcing shortened or canceled practices because of the boys schedule. High school has the boys enjoying pregame meals at the school while the girls parents take turns with sandwiches and snacks after away games. At home games the boys’ concession stand is run by the sophomore class while the girls’ is run by the team manager and parents. The stands are filled for the boy’s games, while the girls were overjoyed to see the athletic director or school board members at more than two games. As tournament time approached the school offered a bus for students to ride to cheer on the boys team. I wonder if the girls game was even mentioned?

At the recent grade school sports banquet I discovered that many of the boy’s coaches are paid, while the girls remain volunteer. Between the fifth and sixth grade the boys could choose among six teams while the girls had two teams with 25 or more girls on a team. I wonder who got the better learning experience?

The Sandusky schools campaigned hard last fall for the levy, asking all of us to support our young people. At least where sports are concerned, supporting our young people means supporting our young men, not our young women.

Jackie Lewis

Sandusky