'I do' want to be happy

'I do' want to be happy For better or for worse might really be better. "There is a link between being married and mor
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

'I do' want to be happy

For better or for worse might really be better.

"There is a link between being married and more reports of happiness and life satisfaction in general, said Christopher J. Mruk, a psychology professor at BGSU Firelands, who specializes in self-esteem studies.

"The people tend to be very affirming of each other; they tend to support each other's self esteem," Mruk said of relationships where their is happiness. "They tend to focus on each other's positive characteristics instead of negative."

Starting off, many new couples may think their relationship will solve life's problem, but this is not always true.

"In the early phases of love, of course, everyone thinks someone is wonderful," Mruk said.

Married people on average have fewer health problems; are less likely to commit crimes; and less likely to abuse drugs or alcohol, Mruk said.

"People with more dangerous lifestyles are less likely to be married," said Randy Leite, associate professor of human development and family studies at BGSU.

Leite teaches classes on marriage.

"Married people do tend to live slightly longer life spans than non-married people," Leite said. "They tend to report higher levels of happiness, less likely to be depressed. Intimate connections are a good thing."

While marriage for some people means happiness, for others it may not have any affect on life quality.

"It really comes down to I think the quality of the marriage," Leite said. "If marriage isolates someone it can bad."