Bill Wright's first book has taken a lifetime to write

SANDUSKY It's never too late to try something new. After eight decades of compiling p
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

SANDUSKY

It's never too late to try something new.

After eight decades of compiling poems, 93-year-old Bill Wright has written his first book: "A Life in Poems."

Wright read excerpts from his book to a packed house at Joe Sundae's on W. Washington Street Sunday during the annual "Celebrate the Arts and Heartlands Magazine," hosted by the Firelands Writing Center.

"In some ways, this is Bill's day. This is his first book and he's threatening to do more," joked Larry Smith, publisher and editor of Wright's book.

In over 100 pages of poetry, Wright details experiences in his life as a Norwalk native, a corporal in World War II, a union organizer, a peace and civil rights activist, a boxer and a husband.

"He's a living model of devotion to creating a caring world," Smith said.

Wright said he hopes people will learn something from his poetry.

"It's a way of expressing yourself and not using trite language," Wright said. "It's a way to share things you want to say but to do so in a different way."

He said he enjoys using metaphors to broaden the impact of a topic.

David Shevin, who wrote a forward in Wright's book, said Wright has always "woven experience into wisdom."

"He's a remarkable spirit," Shevin said Sunday. "He is such a connection to our progressive history."

Also celebrated at the event was the fifth and final volume of "Heartlands: A Magazine of Midwest Life & Art." There was drumming by Dave and Guilda Altman, guitar and singing by Dan Murphy and readings from excerpts of the magazine.