Cedar Point has little to say about public records bill

Tom Jackson
Mar 24, 2014

 

Cedar Point officials have little to say so far on a bill in the Ohio General Assembly that would treat police reports from private police departments as public records, making them available to everyone.

The amusement park has a private police force run by Chief John McMillion, who has more than 20 years of law enforcement experience, has a master’s degree in political science from Bowling Green State University and has certificates from the Ohio Chiefs of Police Executive Leadership College and the FBI National Academy.

He runs a staff of full-time and part-time certified police officers. Cedar Point doesn’t release the size of the force “for safety reasons.” As for the bill, House Bill 429, Cedar Point spokesman Bryan Edwards said, “The legislation was recently introduced and we are in the process of reviewing it. We will continue to follow the bill as it works its way through the legislative process.”

Comments

holysee

Leave them alone. Letting the commoners have access to the records would hurt the shareholders' bottom line.
Corporate personhood trumps everything else. Own it!

goodtime1212

Trying to a make story out of nothing, who cares. Cant say the tax payer has the right to know. The register is just stomping there feet because there not getting what they want, just like Gunner, but Gunner is working with tax dollars.

wjs

Did the Register co-sponsor the House bill? The legislation has an impact on one of the area's largest businesses. It's newsworthy regardless of how you feel about the local paper.

IT'S ME

I'm still trying to figure out if private police departments receive tax payer dollars. I have found that they do use services provided by the tax payers, like the Erie County Prosecutor and our court system.

Spy's picture
Spy

If the crime was serious enough that the real police were actually involved, wouldn't it end up in the public records anyways?

Babo

The concern may be that private police forces might defer to their employer and not report serious crimes that would adversely affect Public relations such as sexual assaults, drug crimes, and employee exploitation.