Dog killing spurs change

Anonymous
Mar 2, 2013

It seems to us the question must be: Is shooting a dog and allowing it to die slowly the proper and appropriate way to respond to a loose dog call?

It's not.

*
Click here for previous stories about the incident and follow the links.
*

Sandusky police chief Jim Lang said on Thursday he is developing a training program for officers in how to handle loose dog complaints. That's good, but there are legitimate questions whether it's appropriate to even have police officers in charge of loose dog complaints, given the enormity of the usual and important responsibilities officers already have. In the past, dog wardens and animal control officers were assigned these responsibilities, and were trained in the tasks.

Sandusky city commissioners are likely to claim budget constraints forced them to eliminate the job. But the city has a $15 million annual budget, and we're convinced there are still responsible ways to spend taxpayer dollars that have not been explored, given the waste that is ever present in the city budget.

We're glad Lang has decided to develop better animal control response practices. This incident should be viewed as an opportunity to correct bad practices; not endorse them.

*
Click here for the e*Paper or get the Sunday Register at a newsstand near you for the rest of this editorial plus coupons and advertiser specials that could save you hundreds of dollars on your next shopping trip.

Comments

The Brownie Elf

BW1, obviously we are on different sides of this. If you listen he tried calling the dog to get in the cruiser. He didn't wake up in the morning and say, "I want to shoot somebody's dog today." The reason the officer shot the dog was to protect himself and others. No, I did not see a child in the video. But if the dog remained loose, who knows what would have happened. I love dogs, but humans come first. And it is not a police officers job to go toe to toe with a dog.

BW1's picture
BW1

IF...who knows what would have happened. Well gee, Brownie, if they don't lock you up or shoot you, who knows what you might do? Real Americans hold their government to a higher standard than wild speculation in justifying its dangerous or destructive actions.

It's the police officer's job to only use deadly force when it's the only viable option to protect human life. Cops go toe to toe with other humans, a much more dangerous species, every day. Note that when I accepted your challenge I didn't qualify it with a demand to have an asp baton in hand, which is more than adequate protection from such a dog.

As I've noted elsewhere, given the circumstances, a gun was the last thing he should have been using. He fired a high powered handgun, one handed, from the hip, in a less than ideal stance, at a potentially unpredictable and fast moving target, in a dense residential neighborhood. That's a very high risk proposition. Contrary to what you see Clint Eastwood do in the movies, that's not a shot with a high probability of success.

The Brownie Elf

If you are the man or the woman in your avatar, obviously you love animals as much as I do and maybe it is your profession. But I am done arguing. It seems as if your mind is made up and that is that which is fine. But police officers have families to go home to. And if all police officers were experts in the animal field as you are, maybe this would have ended different. Good luck and again, if this your profession, thank you for what you do.

Bluto

Maybe an able bodied adult , but what about a small child or frail elderly person ? So , you've injured or killed a dog with your bare hands , eh ? What a stud . ; )))

BW1's picture
BW1

1.Was it a small child or a frail elderly person who shot the dog? No, it was a big strapping (in the video he looks to be over 200 lb.) police officer, with a baton and mace. Another SPD officer faced a similar situation last year and handled it without drawing his weapon. The article appeared on this website.

2.I've neither injured nor killed a dog, but I have successfully fended off attacks. In one case, after two melees, I shouted to the scumbag owner that if he didn't call of his dog, my next move would be to injure it. There's nothing impressive about it - it's just a matter of keeping one's wits about one and understanding dogs.

3. Bare hands and well shod feet, but then the officer appears in the video to be wearing sturdy shoes.

luvblues2

If he had tazed the dog, he would have been able to slip the noose around his neck and had full control.

The Brownie Elf

Ok, and if he had a big cage he could have put the dog inside. If Sandusky carries the X-26 Taser and carries the 25 foot cartridge, the probes will continue to separate every foot they travel. If you watch COPS enough, you will notice the probes may miss shooting a full size human from close range sometimes let alone a dog which is approximately two feet off of the ground. I'm heartbroken a dog had to die but secondary weapons are not going to be very successful on an animal.

The Brownie Elf

And the thing he is holding is an ASP baton, not a "noose." But if he would have hit the dog when it attacked him, then everyone would be saying he should have got it in a headlock.

dire wolf

nobody would be saying that, just you.

The Brownie Elf

Based on all of your comments, sounds like you feel like you could have done better. So go though police academy, start taking some police entry exams and show everyone how you would handle this situation.

BW1's picture
BW1

I could and HAVE done better.

-Bigger Rottweiler, more credibly aggressive, worse scumbag of an owner, and I was a decidedly UNathletic 14 year old armed only with a bag full of newspapers.

-100 lb. Akita, not even a bag of newspapers, although I was an adult, although not as large as the officer in this story. After the parrying the dog's second attack without injuring it, I shouted to the amused scumbag owner that I he should secure his dog because I would not continue such restraint on the third try.

Furthermore, one of this officer's COLLEAGUES could and has done better. There was a story on this site last year about an SPD officer who subdued a large aggressive dog that was ACTUALLY charging him, without using his sidearm. So, you see, no one's holding this officer to any standard that others in his department haven't already met.

DGMutley

I thought that was a noose. Thanks for the info. That means that he no intention of rescuing the dog. Either it was going to comply with his commands or he was going to kill it. It appears his mind was made up before he got out of the car.

This is a sad situation.

The Brownie Elf

Heck no he wasn't trying to "rescue it." He is there to defend himself and others. Would he be trying to rescue a man with a knife running down the street?

DGMutley

I looked at the video again and as he walks past the cruiser there is a loop of rope on the end of the "baton", looks like a snare.

No question he wasn't trying to rescue it. Why wasn't he? Why didn't he knock on Jesse's door? He seemed to know all about Jesse.

The man running down the street with a knife brings up a good point. Your stance is we take the guy out and then ask questions? Like the 90 year old lady in the Columbus suburb who was shuffling step by step in the parking lot with a steak knife in her hand and the female cop took her down because she was a "threat", busting her all up.

BW1's picture
BW1

So, Brownie. I suppose hostage negotiators and other measures aimed at non-violent resolutions are just wasteful fluff, and the role of police is just to kick butt and take names?

BW1's picture
BW1

Guess again. I'd fully support use of the baton. For starters, the dog would have to actually charge for that to happen, as opposed to speculation that it was about to charge. A well placed thump from the baton would leave the dog injured, but able to recover.

Bluto

You raise a valid question . Why wasn't animal control or the warden called ? Or , were they ? All these articles and did the Register ever get an official answer to that question ? It has come up in the comments over and over . Did the Register even ask for an official response on the policy of how the county or Sandusky handle these type of calls ?

BW1's picture
BW1

Wow, Bluto, why ask those questions now? All week long you've been so sure you knew everything there is to know about this.

Bluto

I still believe he did what he had to do . I am just pointing out the shoddy journalism.

BW1's picture
BW1

Well, since he didn't call the animal warden, that means you claim to know that it wasn't an option, so why ask a question to which you know the answer?

Also, why was another SPD officer able to subdue another large dog last year that WAS ACTUALLY CHARGING, without drawing his sidearm? (the story appeared on this website and I seem to remember you commenting on it.) Was that officer from the planet Krypton?

happyfeet64

Well said Deertracker :)

happycamper01

I am very much in support of all our local law enforcement. I would not want their jobs because they are da**ed if they do and da**ed if they don't but I believe this officer did not handle the situation correctly. However, the owner failed to have the dog leashed and under control so she is very much at fault. Had the dog been properly confined she would not have been shot. I do believe the dog was just protecting her property though plus the officer's body language probably scared her. I watched the video and I did not see real visciousness in the dog. Plus when the officer shot Lucy he was far away, too far to use a taser, so I am not sure why the officer shot her like that but I was not the one in the situation. However, I have been confronted by dogs when walking my own dogs or when I was alone that acted like Lucy but never felt so in danger that if I had a gun I would have shot the dog. But again, I was not there and so it is hard to judge a situation fairly when you are not the one in it. However, shooting a dog and then leaving it to suffer IS WRONG. Once he fired one bullet he should have fired another to put the dog out of her misery. Leaving Lucy suffer was just cruel. That I can judge, even hunters are taught not to leave an animal suffer. If you shoot it and it takes off you track it till you find it, then end the suffering. Leaving Lucy to suffer shows no compassion at all.

Swamp Fox

Domestic dogs regardless of their breed are not born aggressive, its learned from their owners actions towards them and environment. I have large dogs some of them considered "aggressive" breeds, they are just large fur babies because of how they were trained and treated. Its always easy to blame someone else, than to take personal responsibility.

tiptapmom

Isn't it illegal for a cop to shoot again once the threat is over?

BW1's picture
BW1

Police officers often are called upon to shoot animals hit by cars to end their suffering.

BW1's picture
BW1

Police officers often are called upon to shoot animals hit by cars to end their suffering.

Nor'easter

Moderators have removed this comment because it contained Personal attacks (including: name calling, presumption of guilt or guilt by association, insensitivity, or picking fights).

Gunner10

I'm always ALL for our Boys in Blue to recieve more training, but how about on things that involve people especially if the city is going to be paying for it. I know if I see a dog running around I don't run up to it to see who the owner is (esp a dog like this) what are they trained for? (I know not ALL of these dogs are trained to hurt or be mean, but....) Would you let your kids run around the yard if you saw a stray ROT, PIT? Esp if you don't know who's dog it is and how it acts? Most of us would say NO! Why? because you love your children enough not to let them get hurt? So, does that mean that just b/c Brad is a police officer means he signed up to get hurt? Don't think so. He is supposed to be protecting people like you, your children and the Postal Worker (who was TRAPPED on someones PORCH B/C the DOG wouldn't let her go!!!!!!!!) Are we failing to see this??? AND if the dog was a house dog, then why was it outside unsupervised? Has anyone asked this and recieved an answer? SANDUSY REGISTER did you ask the dog owner that one? and received a good enough answer? or was it "WELL it was COLD outside and the Dog always goes out by herself".....

Just A THOUGHT!

BW1's picture
BW1

"I know if I see a dog running around I don't run up to it to see who the owner is (esp a dog like this)"

I would, and have done so, and I don't carry a gun. It's also unlikely I could currently pass the physical test to be a police officer. You simply have to understand dogs. The dog most probably tried to corral the postal worker on the porch because Rotts are a herding breed, and they instinctively try to keep everyone in one small area. In that situation, a confident, purposeful approach toward the dog would be very effective in curtailing that behavior.

DGMutley

Gunner10,
If Wilson couldn't handle the dog why didn't he call someone that could?

Pages