It’s not just what you say, but how you say it

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Dec 1, 2013
I recently read an article making an analogy of music and language. If you know how to read musical notation, you’re actually reading two things simultaneously. Written music tells you what note to play and when to play it.
 
Punctuation helps indicate pacing — pause at a comma, stop at a period, but it is still up to the reader to interpret how the author wanted the material paced. Here is an example: read this statement aloud, placing the emphasis on each bolded word.
 
I didn’t say you should leave now.
 
I didn’t say you should leave now.
 
I didn’t say you should leave now.
 
I didn’t say you should leave now.
 
I didn’t say you should leave now.
 
I didn’t say you should leave now.

I didn’t say you should leave now.

Interesting on how the pacing, and the meaning, can change based on where you choose to place the emphasis.

Music notation is not like that.

The composer provides the note to play, the time signature to play it in, the exact time each note should be played; even the volume with which the note should be played. Written language doesn’t have that kind of flexibility.

There is not much room for readers to add their own words to a written piece.

Consider these thoughts when producing advertising.

The language of ads must be clear, simple, and to the point. It should cause an emotional response without depending on a specific performance from the reader. By writing simple and clear advertising, the results of the consumer’s interpretation will be music to your ears.

Comments

Raoul Duke

hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm...

beepx22

And yet if you put music down as a second language you get laughed at lol