BLOG: Is 'Moneyball' dead?

Tom Jackson
Jul 14, 2011

I keep running into trailers for "Moneyball," the new Brad Pitt movie about Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland Athletics.

The movie is based on Michael Lewis' 2003 book, "Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game." The book portrayed Beane as the Napoleon of baseball, a brilliant general manager who put together winning teams on a low budget because he was smarter than anyone else.

I enjoyed the book, but does anyone besides me think the timing of the movie is kind of odd?

With major league baseball resuming today after the All Star break, the A's are in last place in the American League West division, with a 39-53 record, third-worst in the entire American League. Only one National League team has a worse record. The A's will need a hot second half to avoid a losing season.

Here is the team's record for the preceding four seasons: 2010, 81-81; 2009, 75-87 (last place); 2008, 75-86; 2007, 76-86.

Maybe the rest of the league has caught up with Beane. It's probably not entirely his fault that he's lost some of his mojo. Still, it's a good thing Billy Beane is a genius, or he'd have to worry about losing his job.

 

Comments

donutshopguy

Beane was the first to use statistics, in a meanful way, to run a major league baseball club. The league has caught up with him.

BW1's picture
BW1

The movie timing isn't odd.  The Indians weren't doing great when "Major League" came out.  Why go to a movie to see a team win when you can see them win at the ballpark? 

gmeimg

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lin

Moderators have removed this comment because it contained lengthy or off-topic excerpts from other websites. Discussion Guidelines

lin

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Tom Jackson

 donutshopguy,

So is it time for major league baseball to do what the NFL has done, and level the playing field so that Oakland (and Cleveland) has a better chance?