Can we create the future we want?

Sue Daugherty
Mar 23, 2010

They say with every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.  

If we have good times we can also count on having tough times too.  

After being a panelist at Sandusky Register’s Solutions Forum on Tuesday night, it is clear that our current times are not good. 

I heard from audience member who was still trying to find answers to a mortgage problem, a man who lost his job and is facing eviction, a rural resident wondering who is going to help her when she can no longer afford her water bill.These are just to name a few examples. 

I believe Americans are great problem solovers.

When our back is up against the wall, the American culture is triumphant. 

We rediscover and apply two truisms:

Truism #1:  Life is what you make it.   

Truism #2:  Necessity is the Mother of Invention.  

What can we do to speed that phenomenon up? 

Do we really have to wait until more Ohioans have their backs against the wall? 

What would happen we were somehow able to give those who are unemployed and motivated to work, four hours a day, five days a week to spend with other unemployed, motivated people who are also in difficult economic situations. 

And what if this group of people had a skilled facilitator -- someone to lead positive/innovative conversations about what each individual can control. 

Never allowing the discussion to focus on what they can’t.   

Would it change our social & economic paradigm? Would this idea be worth testing?

 

Comments

Gulliver

Now that is something that should have been funded as part of the Economic Recovery Plan.   Not only would it have a meaningful practical application, it would make for some great research for economic development.  (It would make for some interesting psychology research, too.)  The Chamber of Commerce,  ECEDEC and Small Business Administration should come together and invest in something like this -- if the Economic Recovery Plan won't.

Oliver Hardy

Truism #1:  Life is what you make it.  Miss Sue, I have to disagree with you about life is what you make it. In a way, you are correct but life is more like a poker game. Each person gets dealt a hand of cards in life. Some people get a good hand and some people get a really crappy hand. The ones that get a good hand are usually the ones that end up having a good life. These are people who have money, good looks and clout. Then you have the people that get a bad hand. These are people that are poor, may not have good looks or don't know somebody to get a good job. Some of these people overcome their obstacles in life and become successful. But what about the people who are born with physical or mental defects? They sure did not get a good hand of cards.

Gulliver

I agree with that argument, too, Oliver Hardy. But even when you get dealt a crappy hand, you don't have to be a victim.  You can learn from each crappy hand you have been dealt, and get better.  There are good looking people who had parents with money and clout and still amounted to nothing -- that's what they made of their life.  And because it's a free country... I guess they have the right to do that. 

The same applies to people w/out good looks, poor $$ parents with no clout or ambition to model to their children.  Those people have a REALLY crappy hand.  But don't expect me to believe that there is only option -- to be a victim.  This is still the USA -- Not Somalia. 

There are workshops entitled "Solution Focused Problem-Solving".  My experience with people has been when there are problems, our human nature is to focus on what we can't control/what we don't have.   We don't focus our thoughts and our actions on the stuff we can control.   It is the solution centered problem solving that creates change.   So why not invest in mentoring motivated adults to do just that?  (Sounds like we'd get our money back.)  Stoke the fires that will support and inspire the minds of those who can change our social and economic condition.   I"m with the blogstress on this one!  

 

 

Gulliver

I agree with that argument, too, Oliver Hardy. But even when you get dealt a crappy hand, you don't have to be a victim.  You can learn from each crappy hand you have been dealt, and get better.  There are good looking people who had parents with money and clout and still amounted to nothing -- that's what they made of their life.  And because it's a free country... I guess they have the right to do that. 

The same applies to people w/out good looks, poor $$ parents with no clout or ambition to model to their children.  Those people have a REALLY crappy hand.  But don't expect me to believe that there is only option -- to be a victim.  This is still the USA -- Not Somalia. 

There are workshops entitled "Solution Focused Problem-Solving".  My experience with people has been when there are problems, our human nature is to focus on what we can't control/what we don't have.   We don't focus our thoughts and our actions on the stuff we can control.   It is the solution centered problem solving that creates change.   So why not invest in mentoring motivated adults to do just that?  (Sounds like we'd get our money back.)  Stoke the fires that will support and inspire the minds of those who can change our social and economic condition.   I"m with the blogstress on this one!