Own your age

Sue Daugherty
Mar 23, 2010

A few months ago I read an article about being proud of your age.

I think I read it in the AARP Bulletin. It had pictures of physically fit, attractive, women wearing t-shirts that say “Own Your Age.”

In a nutshell this is a movement against ageism -- as in the discrimination and negative stereotyping of people based on their age. These proud "older" people are promoting a message that says I’m happy about who I am at my age.   

I find it interesting that in our culture, men with grey hair and crow’s feet are viewed as sexy, sophisticated, and attractive.  

Most women, however, will go to great expense to hide their grey and wrinkles because in American society grey hair and wrinkles are a detriment -- not an attribute for women.   

Generally speaking, these characteristics on a woman peg her as someone who is “old” -- which is a word we have come to believe is negative. Rarely is a woman with grey hair and crow’s feet perceived as sexy, sophisticated and attractive.

How did that ever come to be? What will it take for aging -- in a woman’s world --  to become socially acceptable? 

What do you do in your own life to make it socially acceptable to “Own Your Age?”

Comments

kURT

C'on Sue....it isn't always about the outside. Wisdom should come with age. Inner beauty is very appealing to many. Sweetness & decency are rare nowadays. This trait alone can be very attractive.

Gulliver

DEAR kURT, That's my point! Own your age... and those characteristics you just described are what will become valued instead of the superficial characteristics we value today.

Thanks for commmenting!! -- Sue

Anonymous (not ...

One of my favorite aphorisms:

When you're green you grow; when you're ripe you rot.

And a ponderous one from Satchel Page that kinda gets to the heart of your blog entry Ms. Daugherty:

'How old would you be if you didn't know how old you are?'

outsider

Had this discussion with my wife and she recalls her first experience with "the importance of a female based on looks" at 8 years old.

Women have accepted this marketing allusion for over a hundred years. No one to blame but yourselves. Stop drinking the kool-aid.