The List: Tom Jackson's list of little-known historical sites

If you're a history buff, you probably know about the area's more obvious attractions, such as the Perry Monument at Put-in-Bay (has a great battle museum), the Edison Birthplace Museum in Milan (where you might meet relatives of Thomas Edison) and the Rutherford Hayes center in Fremont (nice museum, and don't miss the special events.) Here are some places you might have missed:
Tom Jackson
Mar 30, 2012

 

If you're a history buff, you probably know about the area's more obvious attractions, such as the Perry Monument at Put-in-Bay (has a great battle museum), the Edison Birthplace Museum in Milan (where you might meet relatives of Thomas Edison) and  the Rutherford Hayes center in Fremont (nice museum, and don't miss the special events.) Here are some places you might have missed:

1. The Cholera Cemetery, Sandusky. (On Harrison Street, near Adams. Turn north on Harrison from Tiffin and you can't miss it.) A chilling look at Sandusky's greatest disaster, an 1840s epidemic that killed hundreds and caused most the remaining population to flee.

2. War of 1812 battle site. (On the 9000 block of East Bayshore Road in Danbury Township, about 15 miles east of Port Clinton).  The site of a Sept. 29, 1812, battle between American soldiers and American Indians that left eight soldiers and 40 Indians dead. Look for a historical marker and nearby monuments.

3. Military museum at Ohio Veterans Home. Bet you didn't even know the OVH has a museum. It's a nice collection of military artifacts. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday through Wednesday, in the I.F. Mack Building at the OVH, 3416 Columbus Ave., or by appointment. (Call call (419) 625-2454 ext. 1447 to schedule a tour).

4. Maritime Museum of Sandusky, 125 Meigs St. Good displays on Sandusky's maritime heritage, including the role the city played in the Underground Railroad.

5. Second Baptist Church, 315 Decatur, Sandusky. A plaque tells the story of how the historic African American church sheltered runaways on the Underground Railroad. (The church originally was the First Regular Anti-Slavery Baptist Church.) It's still a working church, with about 100 members. If you get interested in Sandusky's Underground Railroad, pick up a self-guided tour pamphlet at Lake Erie Shores and Islands, 4424 Milan Road.

 

The List is a weekly feature posted Mondays at sanduskyregister.com. To suggest a topic for the list, e-mail Sarah Weber at weber@sanduskyregister.com.

Comments

wetsu

Good call on the Cholera Cemetary.  Had it not been for the epidemic Sandusky could have been the size of Cleveland and a major power on the Great Lakes. 

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Captain Gutz

Don't forget the monument to the French Fort over by Gypsum.

Or the ruins of the racoon farm on the Huron River.

How about the earthquake crack south of Bellevue? The blue Hole? Snows Grist Mill? 7 Mile House? Bloomingville Bank?