BCI gets it done

When the state's "elite' criminal investigation agency botches a probe as badly as the Ohio Bureau of Investigation (BCI) did in the killing of 26-year-old Bryan Jones, residents should know already, then, beyond any reasonable doubt, the agency is incompetent to its task.
Matt Westerhold
Sep 2, 2011

When the state’s “elite” criminal investigation agency botches a probe as badly as the Ohio Bureau of Investigation (BCI) did in the killing of 26-year-old Bryan Jones, residents should know already, then, beyond any reasonable doubt, the agency is incompetent to its task.

Whoa. That’s harsh.

Not harsh enough, many would say, when you consider that Jones was asleep on a couch at his parents’ home when two Sandusky County deputies awoke him using a “flash bang” grenade and then shot him five times, blowing off his arm using high-velocity ammunition designed to inflict a maximum degree of injury.

The deputies went into the home and killed Jones about 20 minutes after arriving there, responding to a call from Jones’ parents. It’s not clear what the family told the dispatcher about the circumstances in the moments before they fled from the home.

But in short order, their son was dead.

Asleep, with a shotgun in his lap, chances are, Jones never saw it coming.  The deputies went into the home and stood less than 30 feet from him as he slept. Jolted awake, perhaps, the deputies said Jones pointed the rifle at them and they fired; 19 rounds.

The BCI probe found nothing too concerning, however, about the killing of Jones. At least that’s what’s been said. The agency tied it up in a nice bow and concluded it was all good, before some questions were even asked.  And those that were asked, were brushed aside. Or so we’re told.

But Sandusky County sheriff’s Captain Jose Consolo began an internal investigation the night Jones was shot and killed, and it is likely the best documentation that exists. It was ordered up by sheriff Kyle Overmyer, but rushed to conclusion to accommodate the BCI, and a special prosecutor. 

And Consolo had concerns about the BCI report from the start, according to sworn testimony in the Jones family’s lawsuit against Sandusky County officials and the deputies involved in killing their son.

“That was my first meeting with (BCI investigator) Brokamp. … I attempted to explain to him what I had learned … and I was attempting to explain to Mr. Brokamp some concerns …

Question: And he brushed them off?
Answer: Yes

Question: He didn’t want to hear it?
Answer: Didn’t want to hear it.

An investigator who doesn’t want to hear about concerns in an investigation of an extremely concerning incident is not likely searching for truth, but rather, something else.

The Register has requested a copy of the BCI report under Ohio’s public records law, but it has not yet been released The Ohio Attorney General’s office has been reluctant in the past to release reports, especially when an investigation surrounds a public or an elected official. We know that here in Erie County, for sure.

And it appears there would be ample reason for the BCI commanders to want to
suppress this report, and other reports, perhaps.

There is a whole series of documents that have been released to the Register under the open records statutes, however, that do shed light on BCI’s darkness.

Those documents are available here.

Former U.S. Sen. Mike DeWine was elected Ohio AG last year and he campaigned
as a man intent on rooting out corruption and the slovenly performance of the BCI crime labs, with its backlogs of DNA evidence testing and various other inadequacies.

The Brokamp/BCI investigation of Jones’ death preceded DeWine’s election, but it would be a big boost if DeWine would turn his attention to this matter. A review of the deadly circumstances and critical mistakes —from sending a deputy with a violent history into the home to a BCI investigation that sought to keep questions about what occurred to the minimum – is warranted.

There’s a problem here. How could it be more obvious?

BCI should set the standard for law enforcement in Ohio, and unfortunately, in many ways it does. Even more unfortunately, that standard appears to be unacceptable.

If the BCI commanders are satisfied with the outcome of the Brokamp BCI investigation, then release the report. If they are embarrassed by it, still release the report.

Maybe it’s time, simply, to do the right thing.

Click here for an index to related articles. 

The above is an column published in the Aug. 28 edition of the Register. The opinions of the Register Editoral Board, local columnists and readers are published six days a week on the Register's editorial page.

Comments

Centauri

An investigator who doesn’t want to hear about concerns in an investigation of an extremely concerning incident is not likely searching for truth, but rather, something else.

The Register has requested a copy of the BCI report under Ohio’s public records law, but it has not yet been released The Ohio Attorney General’s office has been reluctant in the past to release reports, especially when an investigation surrounds a public or an elected official. We know that here in Erie County, for sure.

Very good commentary Matt Westerhold. I agree with you 100%

I may criticize the Sandusky Register at times but it is constructive criticism for a better newspaper

The powers that be try to shut down and bury the truth

I have been a critic of the BCI for years

SimpleEnough

What is about High velocity ammo? They used an M16, I would sumise as i read the transcripts and noted that the HK MP5 was unavailablle when requested...The M16 uses .223/5.56 mm rounds Yeah high velocity, the MP5 uses 9mm, but it was unvailable....I guess they could have gone in with a 12 gauge shotgun instead as the 1st back up weapon. (note the guy with the shield only had his service pistol) when attempting to arrest a person with a......  what was it ...oh yeah a shotgun. I still say it all goes back on Bryan as he was once again committing a felony by possesing a firearm... Hey did anyone ask if there is any history between Consualo and the BCI investigator?

Centauri

....I guess they could have gone in with a 12 gauge shotgun instead as the 1st back up weapon.

@ SimpleEnough

How much do you know what damage firearms and ammo does to a human body?

It is bad enough that the .223/5.56 ammo was used in close quarters in a home. This home was not a war zone. It was a home. I have posted before a link to images of what the 223/5.56 ammo does in close encounters. I could have picked much more graphic links to what the ammo does to a head of a person

A shotgun blast makes hamburger of a human at close range of flesh and bone

This young man was clearly mentally ill

Should the powers that be follow Hitler and put to death those who are mentally ill?

SimpleEnough

Hey Centauri, It's called "sarcasm".  Mentally ill? I guess that could be said for anyone at some point in their life then huh? Go to the sandusky county jail and look him up there, also look him up on the county court website for past cases. I'll say it again it all goes back on him and his family, he and they enabaling him helped set it all in motion.......

SimpleEnough

Centauri, I do know what 5.56 will do when fired into a home, and 7.62 x 39mm russian and 30-06. Also know what .45 feels like when it hits.

 

iamrevolutionary

 Keep on it !!  Don't let up!!  

fatherof12husba...

Matt- Jones had a shotgun not a rifle

Julie R.

I've never read a commentary of Matt Westerhold's yet that wasn't right on the money.........and this one is, too.

Sam

Matt Westerhold again displays his is anti-law enforcement bias minus his "best police chief ever", now in federal prison.  

Julie R.

Unlike the former OAG who claimed corruption was the fault of the voters, I voted for DeWine because ~ as Matt W. said ~ he campaigned as a man intent on rooting out corruption and the slovenly performance of the BCI crime labs.

Now it's time for him to prove it.  

Kelly

What an idiot

Julie R.

@ Kelly: If you don't mind me asking...........WHO are you referring to as an idiot?  

gilamonster
Looks like they wanted to pretend they were in MOUT; and break out some toys. It sucks that the HK MP5 was not available, surprised they did not ask for the HKM320. Guess one of them having a rail mounted tactical taser on the weapon was not an option.   As far as ammo goes, you know they do manufacture CQ, CQE, and AET rounds, frangible.Dead right there with little overpenetration of walls. I could only suspect they were using Brown Bear 223/5.56 FMJ; blasting through walls and endangering the whole block. But hey, it looks more like combat. I prefer a Benelli 12 ga. Guess they did not realize they could have loaded first 12 ga round less than lethal, if not knocked out of his socks then let the 00 buck fly.    Could have achieved the same result using a $100 dollar surplus Russian m44 and not even entered the house, though it would be less theatrical than flashbangs. Maybe they can locate a surplus ASU-85 and a few belt eatin LMG's for the next mission.