One Wednesday in Vickery|"One Wednesday" is a series of pictorials exploring small towns in our area on any given Wednesday. Towns will be showcased in the Register the last Sunday of every month.

I chose to go to Vickery. I have driven west on U.S. 6 many times before, but never turned left onto County Road 268.
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

I chose to go to Vickery.

I have driven west on U.S. 6 many times before, but never turned left onto County Road 268.

It was quiet as I traveled early Wednesday morning.

The children had been picked up for school and only a few residents were still pulling out of their driveways for work.

I parked and waited for something to happen.

And waited.

And then I saw a burly man circling the block on his bicycle and approached him.

He was Vernet "Butch" Kardotzke and he greeted me cordially, although apprehensively. After I told him what I was doing he warmed to the idea.

"It's a pretty nice little community to live in. We've enjoyed living here," said the 63-year-old.

He has lived in Vickery his entire life and raised two sons and a grandson with his wife Wilma.

That's the story of many who occupy the homes in an 1-2 mile radius -- the heart of the unincorporated town.

Jeannette Yiesley, 89, was born Dec. 6, 1917, in the home she still lives in on County Road 320.

Yiesley, who is believed to be the oldest living resident in Vickery, can remember when there were two grocery stores, train tracks and a street car.

"It was a big deal to see the train coming because they brought in the mail," she said.

The tracks have since been torn up and the last grocery store, Vickery Market, closed five or six years ago. Now the only way in or out of Vickery is by car.

The feeling is one of isolation in Vickery, which is maybe why it's a good place to raise children and a frustrating place to be a teenager.

Steve David, 21, graduated from Margaretta High School in 2004. He said it was all right in Vickery, "just boring."

There is a certain organic quality to any community.

Vickery is no exception.

To describe the town in absolute terms would be a disservice to the people living there.

So did I meet everyone? No.

Did I meet the people who best exemplify the town? I don't know.

But I did meet some of the people who make up the town of Vickery on Wed., April 18, and on that day I was one of them.