Farmers take planting delay in stride

A cold, wet spring has delayed planting for some Ohio farmers, but they’re not worried yet.
Associated Press
May 10, 2014
The same thing happened last year, and it turned out to be a great season for crops.

Through last Sunday, only 8 percent of the corn had been planted in Ohio, down from the five-year average of 25 percent at that point, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Only 3 percent of soybeans had been planted, below the five-year average of 12 percent.

Joe Cornely, spokesman for the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, told The Columbus Dispatch “farmers are anxious, but they are far from panicking”

“Farmers will tell you that the earlier start you get to the cropping season, the better,” Cornely said.

He said the rule of thumb is that farmers like to have corn planted by mid-May, followed quickly by beans.

David Black, who farms 2,400 acres in central Ohio, said he got a slow start last year, too, and it turned out OK.

“We’ve got plenty of time,” he said. “Last year, we planted until the middle of May, corn and beans, and we had fantastic crops”

With good conditions, farmers might be able to get as much as half of the state’s corn crop planted in a week or so, said Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension corn specialist.