Cut back on meat

An observant person doesn't find it hard to read body language. A wilting flower and an aloof boss both send very clear messages.
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

An observant person doesn't find it hard to read body language. A wilting flower and an aloof boss both send very clear messages.

As a bow-hunter, I have spent countless hours more than 30 years observing wildlife from the vantage point of trees. I do so specifically to hunt deer in a quiet and relatively unobtrusive manner and to put wild, unadulterated meat on my family's table. Coincidently, I witness countless episodes of wild behavior extremely close up. To take a life with minimum stress to both hunted and hunter requires the shot to be at very close range with precisely angled arrow placement and, most importantly, a relaxed animal. This means a large percentage of encounters result in no shots taken. My husband's expert hunting skills always place me in prime locations.

Wildlife, tough and brutal at times, for the most part seems to be pretty joyful if I read the body languages even just reasonably well. Prey animals, upon detecting a predator, act more arrogant and triumphant than fearful. Predators seem to be playing an intriguing and challenging game with immense satisfaction if they win. See how your well fed cat loves to hunt, even if it's merely a spider behind the couch.

In contrast when I read the body language of domesticated animals, and I include humans, I see something quite different. I see boredom, listlessness, sluggishness and often stress. Mega livestock farms raise meat quickly and cheaply. Not hard to read the body language of those animals.

Humans are omnivores. We don't need to eat near the meat that we do. As an overweight nation we need to control our appetites. As a caring nation, let's begin with dialing back on the meat.

Kendall Zimmerman

Berlin Heights