Stand up for smokers

Our Founding fathers fought a war because they didn't think they should be taxed without their consent. Henry David Thoreau refused
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

Our Founding fathers fought a war because they didn't think they should be taxed without their consent. Henry David Thoreau refused to pay his taxes in protest of the Mexican American War and was jailed for it. Susan B. Anthony voted in an election prior to women's' suffrage and was arrested. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus and hundreds were arrested while peacefully protesting alongside of Martin Luther King in their fight against Jim Crow. What do all of these individuals have in common? They all had the courage to stand up for what they thought was right and were willing to accept the consequences of their actions in order to prove a point.

If you smoke or own an establishment that allows smoking, practice civil disobedience by ignoring a law that you perceive as unjust. There will be consequences, but so what? Cooperate with whomever administers the citation to you, show up for court and politely explain to the judge that you have no intention of paying the fine and if he wishes to jail you for smoking a cigarette, then that is his prerogative. That's the approach most of the above Americans took and that's the approach smokers in Ohio should take towards the new smoking ban. If you have the courage to stand up for what you think is right like those we honor above, then the law will be abolished or changed. Simple as that.

I realize that fighting to preserve civil liberties and the right to smoke are two different things, but the concept is the same. I also realize that the majority voted for the ban. As citizens, we are supposed to respect this, but it's kind of hard when the whole idea of rule by the majority has been all but thrown out the window in America. Hopefully, standing up for what you believe in won't be thrown out the window as well.

Guy Seibel

Huron