REGISTER VIEWPOINT: No mail Saturday? If that's what it takes

The U.S. Postal Service prides itself on delivering through rain, hail, sleet or snow, but perhaps not any more on Saturday. While the proposal to eliminate residential and business deliveries on Saturday is clearly to help the federal agency to save money by eliminating up to 40,000 jobs, the pros and cons of such a move are not as readily apparent.
Sandusky Register Staff
Apr 7, 2010

 

The U.S. Postal Service prides itself on delivering through rain, hail, sleet or snow, but perhaps not any more on Saturday.

While the proposal to eliminate residential and business deliveries on Saturday is clearly to help the federal agency to save money by eliminating up to 40,000 jobs, the pros and cons of such a move are not as readily apparent.

For example, many federal, state and local agencies may have to shift their delivery of checks and other benefits to make sure they are delivered before Saturday. Also, on weeks with federal holidays on Mondays, postal customers would have to go three days without receiving any mail.

The Postal Service, which receives no federal funding, relies on revenue from the sale of postal products and services to pay its bills. With the increase of paying bills via the Internet and some stiff competition for the delivery of bigger packages, the Postal Service needs to make changes, or raise its rates yet again, to lessen an expected revenue loss of $238 billion by 2020.

If eliminating Saturday delivery helps keep postal rates from rising further, we're for it -- if reluctantly.

With post offices still being open on Saturdays under the proposal, you will still be able to buy stamps, send mail and more on the weekends. Just don't expect those Netflix deliveries on Saturdays anymore.

If such cost-cutting moves keeps the Postal Service healthy without affecting services too much, we can't help but, pardon the pun,give elimination of Saturday delivery or stamp of approval.