LETTER: Cheaper not always better

Many American businesses throughout the past 50-plus years sought cheaper labor and materials by moving their work offshore. Then the cheaper products and materials were shipped back to the U.S. for sale and distribution.
Commentary
Apr 1, 2010

Many American businesses throughout the past 50-plus years sought cheaper labor and materials by moving their work offshore. Then the cheaper products and materials were shipped back to the U.S. for sale and distribution.

During this time, many corporate headquarters and financial accounts were moved offshore to take advantage of deceptive tax shelters, thus contributing to the debasement of our country's financial stability. Meanwhile other countries were allowed to flood our marketplace with the same products that we traditionally produced, but at a much lower cost than we could ever make them. This practice displaced thousands of America's businesses and employees over the years because of the uncompetitive lower wage scales and foreign government price subsidizations.

Their long-term, business, strategic plan has always been to drive American businesses out of business. Many of our highly paid and highly educated self-serving government representatives willfully and shamefully allowed these practices to occur. Our purchasing citizenry was duped into thinking that cheaper is better.

So instead of supporting homegrown businesses we chose to buy the cheaper foreign-made products. With so many of our talented people now unemployed, should we still be thinking that cheaper is better?

Don McGee

Huron