‘Dilbert’ comic strip tackles homosexuality

Saturday’s panel then spotlights Dilbert and another employee, who’s fearful he can never visit India again because of the law.
Andy Ouriel
Feb 7, 2014

 

The comic strip “Dilbert” typically harps on irrational inter-office politics.

But for two days, author Scott Adams featured themes more serious than bosses micromanaging, oblivious employees obtaining promotions and tech-savvy professionals mocking the digitally impaired.

Today and Saturday, the syndicate distributing “Dilbert” — in an unusual move — sent the Register two sets of comic strips.

The main strip, intended for publication, features topics such as homosexuality, war and politics.

The alternative strips exclude any talk of these matters.

A two-day series essentially mocks a recent Indian Supreme Court decision to make homosexual behavior illegal.    

Character Dogbert, Dilbert’s talking pet dog, discusses in today’s strip how the court made it “a crime to be born gay.” He continues on, dubbing the decision as “ignorant”

Saturday’s panel then spotlights Dilbert and another employee, who’s fearful he can never visit India again because of the law.

The strip ends with Dilbert claiming Indian officials “might nuke the Taj Mahal” with the employee responding, “I know! That place is so gay, right?”

The Register decided to print the strips with controversial themes — the ones Adams and others intended for publication.

An email sent using the contact form at Dilbert.com, seeking to understand what message Adams wanted to convey in the series, was not answered. 

So the Register took to Facebook, asking people about their opinions of the two-day series.

Most agreed with the Register’s decision, siding with publishing the controversial series.

“Run the gay strips,” Patrick Fox wrote. “It’s 2014. If they don’t like it, then don’t read it” Wrote Lindsay Roth: “Run the gay strips. It’s time for people to get over themselves”

A few, however, seemingly disagreed. “At least the Indians have common sense” Debby Adams Krofft said. “There are no morals in this country anymore. Anything goes. Sad”

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