Pearl Harbor veteran was on duty at dawn Dec. 7, 1941

Many Navy sailors were off duty or asleep at Pearl Harbor just before 8 a.m. Dec. 7, 1941. It was a Sunday morning. Buford Barber was on duty and wide awake, working as a radioman aboard the USS Helena, a light cruiser moored to a dock next to the Oglala, a mine-laying Navy ship. Then the Japanese attacked.
Tom Jackson
Dec 7, 2010

 

Many Navy sailors were off duty or asleep at Pearl Harbor just before 8 a.m. Dec. 7, 1941.

It was a Sunday morning. Buford Barber was on duty and wide awake, working as a radioman aboard the USS Helena, a light cruiser moored to a dock next to the Oglala, a mine-laying Navy ship.

Then the Japanese attacked.

"I didn't see the planes," said Buford, 89, now a Sandusky resident living at the Commons of Providence with his wife, Elizabeth. "There was an explosion and the ship kind of rocked a little bit.

"I could see a vent right outside the radio shack," he said. "You could see the fire come out."

At first, he didn't know what happened.

"But I knew it wasn't good," he said.

 

Comments

mikel

thank you sir for your service! 

goofus

Sir, I too thank you. I don't know how long you served on CL50 but the accounts of your ships accomplishments as listed on Wikkipedia was truly outstanding`. The first ship to get the Navy Unit Commendation, once again, thank you Mr. Barber.

samiam

Thank you, sir, for your service and sacrifice.  It's great to have another report of history recorded.  God bless you, sir.

Kottage Kat

God Bless you sir, and I also THANK YOU for your service to my country. Let Freedom Ring.