Huron fire station set for upgrade

City officials recently agreed to spend about $130,000 on repairs at the Huron Fire Department’s Main Street headquarters.
Andy Ouriel
Aug 29, 2013

 

“The maintenance of all of the city’s facilities is a top priority,” Huron city manager Andy White said.

The enhancements, scheduled to begin soon and wrap up by fall, include:

• Paving the cracked concrete driveway.

• Replacing the garage door thresholds, providing fire trucks and ambulances smoother access in and out of the station.

• Turning two bathrooms into handicap-accessible facilities. q Installing new carpeting in various areas.

• Fixing water-damaged masonry.

• Placing several security cameras in and around the station, with a monitoring station for firefighters to check on.

Some areas are receiving upgrades for the first time since the fire station opened in 1972, Huron fire Chief Steve Osterling said. “These upgrades are important just to keep the infrastructure up to date,” Osterling said.

The $130,000 comes from a pool of recently added debt totaling about $525,000, specifically earmarked to upgrade faulty infrastructure throughout Huron.

Other upgrades presently ongoing:

• Shoreline and landscaping improvements at the former ConAgra site. q Sprucing up the Lake Shore Electric Railway Trail, running parallel to U.S. 6 and Cleveland Road and connecting Woodlands Elementary to Huron High School. q Paving Jim Campbell Boulevard.

• Widening Rye Beach Road south of the Ohio 2 bridge, near the railroad tracks.

Huron officials assumed debt because there’s not enough money in Huron’s annual budget to address infrastructure issues. The city borrowed money at a low interest rate to fund construction improvements.

“There’s an economic sentiment: If you have no debt, then you are not doing anything,” White said. “Debt, if utilized correctly, is a very effective tool to develop a community.”

Huron’s total debt heading into 2013 was about $3.2 million, mostly from water and utility expenses. The city should pay off about $253,000 in owed funds this year.

Had the city avoided creating any new debt, area taxpayers could have paid off all existing obligations by 2023.

Comments

worddrow811

Are there any plans to remove the plants/bushes, etc. along said trail? That area is trouble waiting to happen if the users of said trail cannot be seen from the highway, especially for young children because it is a tunnel-effect. High visibility is a priority and what are the officials thinking by creating a dangerous, secluded space? The city officials are a joke, in my opinion, and need to get off their ego-based high horses. Have a nice day.

bnjjad

well that was not quite what I was expecting. I was expecting some words about letting it go back to nature instead of building it up.

Any "nature trail" or bike path should not have to be "High visibility" to an adjacent highway. Whats the point then? Young children should be accompanied on those to begin with. It is not a babysitter/play ground.

Azure Ray

I feel that the bike trail is becoming "too visible." It has been there a long time as a simple dirt trail, very secluded, but served as a nice nature walk. By paving it, it will be very busy and won't be as peaceful.

Informed

It's not meant to be peaceful....it's meant to provide a way for kids to walk from the high school or Woodlands without having to walk down Cleveland Rd where there are no sidewalks.