Huron City Council OKs contract for Lake Erie Boat Week

HURON A contract between Huron and Lake Erie Boat Week's organizer was finalized with council's approval on Tuesday. "Do we finally have everything in order?" asked Huron Mayor Marilyn Shearer. Indeed, they do. Five conditions that held up negotiations have been ironed out, city manager Andy White said.
Heather Chapin-Fowler
Jul 28, 2010

HURON

A contract between Huron and Lake Erie Boat Week's organizer was finalized with council's approval on Tuesday.

"Do we finally have everything in order?" asked Huron Mayor Marilyn Shearer.

Indeed, they do. Five conditions that held up negotiations have been ironed out, city manager Andy White said.

Council voted unanimously to accept the contract, which has been in the works for several months. It effectively opens the door to the event, scheduled for Sept. 7-12.

"I think this represents a very earnest effort on behalf of everyone," Shearer said. "We're looking forward to a very interesting week."

Lake Erie Boat Week will host a number of events beyond just boat races, such as food vendors, bands and island tours.

With contract logistics out of the way, the Huron Chamber of Commerce is also ready to stand behind Lake Erie Boat Week, a spokesman there said.

"We would be more than happy to join the other groups in making this a successful event," said Doug Studer, of the Huron Chamber of Commerce.

Earlier this year, Boat Week organizer Janie Vogel asked the chamber to help bring the event to Huron, but the chamber held the issue at arm's length.

They attributed the delays to the contract issues between the city and Vogel, Suder said.

The event was scheduled last year in Port Clinton, but plans fell through just months before it would have launched.

Vogel said she's looking to make Lake Erie Boat Week an annual event in Huron.

In other news, Huron council members unanimously accepted a $19,700 grant that Huron police applied for and received. The grant will fund various police activities in Huron schools, such as drug education programs.

With a lagging economy and state cuts, the school needed additional funds to help offset anticipated decreases in funding.

Huron police intend to apply for the grant each year through the Ohio Drug Use Prevention Grant Program. The money covers part of the school resource officer's salary.