Skip that part

Read George Will in today's Register
Anonymous
Mar 15, 2013

When asked to explain the brisk pace of his novels, Elmore Leonard said, “I leave out the parts that people skip.”

You will not want to skip anything in William Zinsser’s short essays written for the American Scholar magazine’s website and now collected in “The Writer Who Stayed,” a book that begins with him wondering why “every year student writing is a little more disheveled.”

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One answer is that too few have read Zinsser’s earlier book “On Writing Well.”

His answer is: “People now get their information mainly from random images on a screen and from random messages in their ears, and it no longer occurs to them that writing is linear and sequential, sentence B must follow sentence A.”

Tooting his own trumpet is not the style of this self-effacing and decorous WASP, who never leaves his Manhattan apartment or boards a plane or train without a jacket (J. Press, of course) and tie.

Others, however, who cherish the craft of writing should toot it for him, lest young writers miss exposure to lapidary sentences such as: “I doubt if I’m the only person who has never quite understood what postmodern means, or how long post is supposed to last; the word floats in a vast sea of postness.”

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Comments

The Hero Zone's picture
The Hero Zone

I do agree that writing skills are something that are crucial and necessary for young people to succeed. It is an ever-evolving process that requires practice. In a "TL;DR"/executive summary world it can be difficult but not impossible. I have learned a lot in my short time blogging and hope that my style has been refined over time. This is also why not just reading books is important but other kinds of works including bad examples.

Unabasho

Write something daily
Read excellent works daily
The skills will follow