REGISTER VIEWPOINT: Sandusky charter five-year tune-up

Sandusky's charter is due for its five-year tune-up, in terms of a review of its charter. We've enlisted 14 mechanics to form a charter review committee and get under the hood and fix what is wrong. Should we change engines and our form of government to a strong mayor?
Sandusky Register Staff
May 15, 2010

 

Sandusky's charter is due for its five-year tune-up, in terms of a review of its charter.

 

We've enlisted 14 mechanics to form a charter review committee and get under the hood and fix what is wrong.

 

Should we change engines and our form of government to a strong mayor?

 

Should we throw more money at city commissioners, hoping that that could lead to better drivers and smoother roads in the future?

 

Should we reduce the number of cylinders, or commissioners, to take reduce the influence of politics and voting, or road, blocs.

 

These are all questions the city's charter review committee will explore over the next several months.

 

Clearly, Sandusky is not motoring down the road of prosperity the way we would all like. There have been potholes and detours along nearly every path our city leaders have led us.

 

But while the five-year tune-up of the charter is a necessary and responsible move, making wholesale changes just for the sake of change may not be, as interim city manager Don Icsman points out.

 

"Any change you make, you have to take it to the voters, like the Constitution," Iscman said. "And the more you do, the more the public can get confused, and then they may vote 'no.' ...So I tried to give (the charter review committee) the advice of limiting (their recommendations) to the major things."

 

We thank each and every member of the charter review committee for volunteering their time and efforts to make Sandusky a better city.

 

Ultimately, however, it will be the residents, as Icsman points out, who will have the final say on what path is taken.

 

Perhaps yesteryear's jalopy of a charter won't work to fix the problems in our city's future and we need an upgrade to a modern vehicle that fits the city's practical needs, not our wildest dreams.

 

Perhaps that old clunker simply needs better maintenance and a responsible driver who does a better job of sticking to the GPS coordinates and gas budget our commission has provided.

 

Either way, our bags are packed and we're ready to turn the corner.