LETTER: China's not what it was

Centuries ago Europeans were mad for all things Chinese. We all know silk was the most obvious of the desired tradable goods, but in
Sandusky Register Staff
May 13, 2010

 

Centuries ago Europeans were mad for all things Chinese. We all know silk was the most obvious of the desired tradable goods, but in reality anything from China was revered due to its uniqueness and rarity. If we fast forward to the present we can easily see that this is not so much the case anymore.

In the present day United States consumers come in contact with goods from China every day, most of the time without even noticing it. It has become such a common practice to see "Made in China" on a product label that we automatically assume it to be there before we even bother to look. In fact, now it is nearly impossible to find anything American made and also quite expensive to obtain. China has lost its sense of mysticism and manufacturing obscurity to become a mass producer of American ideas. Likewise, it appears the United States has lost its sense of tradition and innovation to the lure of cheap labor and profits.

Gone are the days of uniqueness and oddities among products; the Chinese will forever mass-produce shoddy carbon copies that Americans will forever buy.

Bryan Wood

Milan