Keeping the dream alive

On Aug. 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his historical “I Have a Dream” speech, calling for an end to racism in the United States.
Alissa Widman Neese
Jan 21, 2013

“Back then it was about race, but now I think it’s just in general,” said Brianna Collins, 16, a junior at Perkins High School. 

“He was trying to be a voice for all of us American people, to teach us to love one another,” Collins said. “That message will always be there.”
 
The Sandusky Citizens Coalition hosted a luncheon Saturday morning at Ebenezer Baptist Church to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
 
The group selected Collins and senior Taylor Hayes, 18, both Perkins High students, to speak at the event. They addressed a theme from one of King’s speeches: “Let no man pull you low enough to hate him.”
 
Sometimes it’s difficult for younger people to understand the magnitude of King’s accomplishments because they weren’t alive during the civil rights movement, Hayes said.
 
“But when you go digging, research and see the things he went through to gain the freedoms we have today, it has more of an impact,” she said. “It hits you. I get it.”
 
As acts of violence like shootings and murders continue to draw national attention, King’s advocacy of non-violence is more important than ever, Hayes said.
 
“He didn’t just promote it, he lived by it,” she said. “His words, his actions are powerful. They’re everlasting.”
 
Read more of Collins' and Hayes' messages in today's Register or epaper. 

Comments

jon491

DREAMS don't come true.

rickross2

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SamAdams

King's dream has yet to be realized. He dreamed of a day when people were "judged by the content of their character" rather than "the color of their skin." In King's day, non-whites were treated like second class citizens by some people in some places. Today, non-whites are given special "rights" like affirmative action, and the second a non-white does something for which he rightfully deserves sanction, the first words out of his mouth are all too frequently "racism."

How is it that more people don't find THAT offensive? Treating somebody differently, whether better or worse, based in skin color is racism. And ACCUSING people of racism where none exists only serves to belittle something that, in TRUE form, is reprehensible.

Bluto

That statement goes both ways Sam . There have been plenty of times on this very site where the first thing someone says is ( I can see the race card being played on this ... ) . So , this just gets perpetuated by white people as well . It becomes it's own monster . People carelessly throw it out before the fact . Just as you have right here . Who is keeping the race card issue alive ? Not just non-whites , as you put it . I prefer people of color . Doesn't sound so negative . : ) I do agree about judging people on individual merit though.

SamAdams

Sorry for the terminology. I thought "non-white" was more inclusive since it covers everything EXCEPT white, while "color" used to refer only to black people (and not in a complimentary fashion).

I won't argue with you. The race card gets played for no other reason than the person playing it is a "person of color," and people (rightfully) jump all over it. And then, just because some have learned to expect it, they in turn jump on it in some kind of a pre-emptive fashion. Racism isn't dead. It's just changed, and it can't be denied that it stems from pretty much all directions.

I've always believed that the most qualified man (or woman) for the job should get the job, NOT the most qualified whatever-the-definition-needed-to-meet-a-quota. I believe that the top students should get into the top colleges, NOT the top blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, women, or handicapped in certain percentages.

Want to do better? Work harder. But just as unreasoning racism kept some people from getting jobs (or whatever) in the past, it's now preventing the most qualified students from getting into the best colleges (among other things). It doesn't matter how racism is enshrined, or from which direction it comes. It's WRONG.

Your skin color (or gender or sexuality) has NOTHING to do with whether or not you're a decent human being. It has no effect on your IQ. The only thing I judge when I meet new people is how they treat their current friends, and how they initially treat me. Performance matters. Character matters. Skin color? It shouldn't. So why do some maintain that it does? It's always been something of a mystery to me!

The Big Dog's back

sam, nepotism plays a bigger role in hiring than any Affirmative Action.

deertracker

Sometimes the top student is a minority but still can't get in. It is a myth that black people have a problem being called black. I prefer black instead of African American. What category do you put people in that are bi-racial or "half white"? Skin color shouldn't matter but it cleary does Sam! There is no mystery just denial. "Unreasoning racism"? Explain that one! Maybe just maybe the race card was dealt so it was played!

SamAdams

"Unreasoning racism" is, just like it says, without reason. At least not a RATIONAL reason! If I don't like a black man, it's because he's a jerk not because he's a black man. If I don't like a white man it's because HE'S a jerk, not because I'm compensating for something else.

And when I say "unreasoning racism" is a mystery to me, that's because it is. Why on earth would skin color matter any more than hair color or eye color or height or...? I just don't get why there are some people who seem to think it does.

deertracker

The "reason" is RACE Sam! Duh!

The Big Dog's back

Ahhhh yes, the good ole days when "non-whites", Black people for those who haven't figured it out, rode at the back of the bus, drank from different drinking fountains, hung after Sunday services. Those were the days.

Huron_1969

Yeah a long time ago. It's very different today

deertracker

Correct! It is different but not much better.

The Big Dog's back

I don't consider anything that happened in my lifetime "a long time ago".