LETTER: Cancer coverup?

About four years ago, my grandson, Kole Keller, was diagnosed with a brain tumor. He had surgery on Dec. 2, 2005. The next we
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

About four years ago, my grandson, Kole Keller, was diagnosed with a brain tumor. He had surgery on Dec. 2, 2005.

The next week I contacted the Sandusky County Health Department nurse. I talked to her about some of the other cancer cases in the area. We both agreed that it would be a good idea to possibly do a study on the cases and get the State Department of Health involved. The Sandusky County and Ohio health departments teamed up to do a detailed study of the cancer cluster cases -- 20 in the last 7-8 years. The families met with both departments.

I think all agree this is a rare event to have 20 cancer cases in such a small area. Last spring the cancer victims' families met with the state and local health departments. We thought he spatial analysis -- red pinheads on a map where the cancer victims lived and where they spent most of their time and also overlays for the map that will show dump sites, industry sites, etc. -- would eventually be shared with the victims' families.

The state and local health departments said it would be July 2009 when this info would be finished. July came and went, and we were told they could not give out all of this information because of privacy laws. They said a watered-down version would be presented to the cancer victims' families this fall.

Then we were told in September that they could not find a happy medium because of privacy laws. Four years later (and many more cancer cases), and still no more information. The cancer victims' families who had to endure so many trials and tribulations, heartaches and even death are told that the health department cannot give us the information they promised to share with us.

We have been through enough. It has been about four years since we started this study. It is wrong to withhold information from these families and the public. This cancer cluster is a very rare event, and everything possible to help future generations from going through this horrific disease should be pursued and presented to the public.

Maybe these organizations and people associated with them do not want the truth exposed. Please contact your local or state elected officials.

Steve Keller

Clyde