LETTER: Control immigration

There are a lot of misconceptions about migrant workers, but when it comes down to it, the truth is that they're legally here to do
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

There are a lot of misconceptions about migrant workers, but when it comes down to it, the truth is that they're legally here to do what we won't: hard work. Some businesses, such as Willoway Nurseries Inc. in Huron, are unable to get a stable workforce locally and resort to hiring migrant workers. These workers are a part of the federal H-2A agricultural guest-worker program and are legally employed. Many people have never heard of this program, so they sometimes make assumptions about the workers being illegal immigrants. With this program, people can come from Mexico- or anywhere else- on a work visa for about ten months. The program is a legal and practical solution to labor shortages: it's helping meet the demands of the agricultural sector, so domestic food production isn't shipped overseas.

However, there are problems that come with having migrants in our country. It's never easy for a worker to l eave his family behind in his home country, but it's a bigger problem when the worker brings his family to the U.S. with him. That causes population problems, and it's a hassle for the foreigners to have to adapt to a new way of life -- that is, if they choose to adapt. Some foreigners come to America and don't get an education or learn the English language while they're there. It isn't fair that America has to adjust to all the different cultures and languages, especially Spanish, but America doesn't encourage the workers to learn English by having everything printed in Spanish. I think the workers that are employed legally should stay in the country because they help stimulate the economy, but illegal immigration needs to be controlled more firmly because too many immigrants cause job losses for Americans.

Rachel Bourne

Sandusky