REGISTER VIEWPOINT: Yacht Club needs to take 'no' for anwswer

It's been a year and the Sandusky Yacht Club still wants part of Perry Street -- the former site of Surf's Up -- for its parking lot
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

It's been a year and the Sandusky Yacht Club still wants part of Perry Street -- the former site of Surf's Up -- for its parking lot.

We argued against it then, and we're arguing against it now, because the city's position is that part of Perry Street is public property. Whether the land the club wants will affect the actual Marina District development remains to be seen, but we need to let the whole picture play out before chopping off little bits for anyone. To throw this cog into the development wheel is simply reckless and irresponsible of the Yacht Club.

Our position then is the same as our position now: The Yacht Club has to take no for an answer.

What's changed in the last year? The Yacht Club has gone to court. Who knows how long that will take to sort out, holding up a project that must prove it can work for the betterment of all Sandusky and the surrounding area.

Other than that, what else is new? In fact, what have to say now is what we had to say then, and we see no point in wasting new words on this greedy little grab. So here we are, from Sept. 5, 2007:

"The Yacht Club is a long-standing member of the community, but whatever it has in mind will benefit the club first and the larger community second. As long as the Marina District project is meant for public use, decisions regarding it have to take precedence.

"Indeed, the club ought to reach into its own recent history for an example. Back in the late 1980s, the club wanted to expand its marina and sought city help in doing so. The negotiations took a while, but the city eventually agreed to help -- on the condition the breakwall of the expanded marina be open to the public for fishing or just sightseeing along the bayfront. It's worked out well for all involved. Expensive boats tie up in the marina, guarded by a wall of riprap -- along which ordinary people stroll, watch sunsets or drown bait. Cooperation was the key, and it's needed again here."