LETTER: The lessons of history

The antiwar protests during the Iraq intervention revived slogans and clichs of the isolationist movement in America before the Seco
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

The antiwar protests during the Iraq intervention revived slogans and clichs of the isolationist movement in America before the Second World War. In both cases opponents claimed military action was motivated by evil economic interest.

During the Civil War, the Democratic candidate for president in 1864, George McClellan, stated he would sign a peace treaty with the South if elected. He was ahead in the polls, and if he had won, we would have two countries. However, before the election, Grant took Vicksburg and Sherman took Atlanta, changing the psyche of the Northern electorate.

Before World War II, most people in Europe favored peace over resistance to tyranny. In England, the young and the brightest signed the Oxford Union Pledge they would not fight "for King and country." In the U.S. only 13 percent were willing to see the U.S. go to war with Nazi Germany. FDR showed great leadership by starting the "Lend Lease Program" which probably saved Britain.

The peaceniks were also against President Reagan's heavy military budget and his military posturing. But he was able to bury the Soviet Union.

Even Pearl Harbor was America's fault, according to the isolationists. They said it was because of the dire influence of big business.

The Islamofascists want to kill us. Israel has been negotiating with them for 55 years and nothing has been accomplished.

Since 9/11, the academics have added innumerable courses on Islam on college campuses. Norman Mailer called the ruins at Ground Zero "More beautiful than the buildings." From a professor at Rutgers: "We should be aware that the ultimate cause of 9/11 is the fascism of U.S. foreign policy." And from a professor at the University of Massachusetts: "(The American flag) is a symbol of terrorism and death and fear and destruction and oppression."

Will we be subverted or shall we learn the lessons of history?

Ronald Mainous

Port Clinton