LETTER: Just vote

Too many people in America today take their right to vote for granted. So much in fact, that less than 50 percent of people turn out
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

Too many people in America today take their right to vote for granted. So much in fact, that less than 50 percent of people turn out to vote in any given election. By not voting, millions of Americans sacrifice their say in their government. Young people and lower income families rarely have their issues addressed because they don’t turn out to vote. Politicians and the government spend lots of time and money on senior citizen’s issues such as Social Security, yet little time on the rising cost of college education or on saving welfare programs. Senior citizens vote in huge numbers, and what are politicians looking for? Votes.

Even worse than not voting, is not being registered to vote. Registering to vote is simple, easy and will take you less than five minutes of your time. You can find voter registration forms at libraries and at most governmental agencies. People should also keep in mind that, yes, convicted felons can vote as long as they’re not currently serving time. Also remember that if you’ve moved since the last time you voted, you’ll have to re-register.

With absentee voting available to everyone, no one has an excuse not to vote anymore. Simply fill out an absentee ballot request form when you register to vote, and the board of election will mail you a ballot that you can fill out in the privacy of your home. Additionally this year, many boards of elections will hold early voting where people can come in to vote before Election Day.

If people don’t vote, America loses its democratic tradition. Whom ever you support I would encourage you to go, register to vote and then on Nov. 7, exercise the right so many have died to protect.

Jacob Redfern

Port Clinton

Sophomore, Bowling Green State University