U.S. economy has international flavor

Red tape and the confusion of bureaucracy can stop business growth dead in its tracks.
Melissa Topey
Jun 24, 2012

Red tape and the confusion of bureaucracy can stop business growth dead in its tracks.

This is especially true for immigrants who try to open businesses in the United States failed endeavor can cost them everything.

More than one in six owners of small businesses in the U.S. were born in another country, according to a recent study released by the Fiscal Policy Institute, a nonprofit public policy researcher.

This is a dramatic increase from two decades ago, when immigrants made up about 12 percent of small-business owners.

Even as the role of immigrants in the small business community continues to grow, Congress is debating several proposals to deal with immigration.

"In some communities we see a political climate that creates a hostile environment for immigrants," said Frank Mauro, executive director for the Fiscal Policy Institute. "This report shows that, as a country, we can't go down that path."

One local business owner wholeheartedly agrees, and he'd like to know why the federal government makes it so difficult for immigrants to start a business.

"It's so hard, with so much red tape," said Maurizio Buttinelli, owner of Amarone Italian Restaurant in Huron.

Read more in Sunday's Register.

Comments

ADHD

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Contango

Great food. IMO, the best Italian in the area!