Quest for perfection can lead to obsession

Nose too big? Make it smaller. Lips too thin? Make them fuller. What sometimes starts as a nip here and a tuck there can turn
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

Nose too big? Make it smaller. Lips too thin? Make them fuller.

What sometimes starts as a nip here and a tuck there can turn into a cosmetic surgery obsession resulting in multiple surgeries.

Vern Bingman, psychology professor at Bowling Green State University, said the need for plastic surgery can stem from something as simple as wanting to remain attractive.

“As women age, features that illicit spontaneous attraction diminish,” Bingham said.

As a result, some people become obsessed with their quest for perfection, but never quite arrive there, always finding a new fault to focus on.

The plastic surgery obsession could also be the result of a deeper issue called Body Dysmorphic Disorder. The mental disorder is a preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance.

People who are suffering from the disorder can spend at least an hour each day focusing on the imperfections in their appearance.

Some people suffering from the disorder will look to cosmetic surgery to fix their imperfections, but the surgeries often only provide temporary relief, according to Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Web site.

In 2006, nearly 11.5 cosmetic plastic surgeries were performed. The most common imperfections people are focusing on include liposuction, breast augmentation, eyelid surgery, abdominoplasty and breast reduction, according to the Board Certified Plastic Surgeon Web site.