Missed chance in Bellevue

With much sadness I read about the upcoming demolition of a great house on Main Street in Bellevue. I was sure Mr. Bassett would fin
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

With much sadness I read about the upcoming demolition of a great house on Main Street in Bellevue. I was sure Mr. Bassett would find a not-for-profit organization to move and use the building.

I was willing to move the building, invest in Bellevue, with my personal savings. With any encouragement and some assistance from the city, institutions and businesses in the area, the house could have been save by me or someone else. I spent six-month and money last year doing all I could to hire a mover, arrange for temporary utility line drops, and locate land.

The lost of this building is not from lack of interest. It is from lack of city governance to protect Bellevue's valuable patrimony, from few incentives to invest in the older buildings for the community's economic health, and from no disincentives to tear-down buildings. Tearing down a building this good is pure wastefulness and greed. The building has commercial and residential viability right now. The last thing needed is another parking lot or large-scale gas station on Main Street.

As America's population ages and gas prices spiral up, Bellevue has what many people want -- a walkable compact friendly town with a variety of housing types and which is visually appealing. It is close to major cities, so their advantages are close by. People can live in any of 1,000 ugly suburbs. Bellevue is unique.

The businesses, services, schools, cultural organizations and mix of residential units that make a town successful can be located in Bellevue's one-of-a-kind buildings, if they are there.

I sincerely hope the city government and business leaders will take action to stop the erosion of Bellevue's core.

Rebecca L. Stevens

Montgomery Village, Md.