Talking teen drivers

Imagine that you're driving on the road, and all of a sudden, you're hit by another car. It turns out that the person who smashed yo
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

Imagine that you're driving on the road, and all of a sudden, you're hit by another car. It turns out that the person who smashed your car was talking on their cell phone. What would you do? Well, I might have a solution to this problem.

When people are talking on their cell phone and driving, it can cause many problems, like people getting in car accidents. People think they need to be on their cell phones all the time, especially teenagers.

Since parents think that it's necessary for teenagers to have cell phones, it will raise the risk of car accidents when they get their licenses. The new study found that cell phone distractions cause 2,600 deaths and 330,000 injuries in the U.S. every year. Drivers talking on cell phones are 18 percent slower to react to break lights.

The only time people should be talking on their cell phones is if an extreme emergency occurs. For example, if someone sees another car or person disabled on the road, then they could talk. However, if there isn't an emergency, there is no need to talk.

I know teenagers will think that it's unnecessary for this letter to be written, but from the time teens get out of school, they're constantly on their cell phones. This will lead to, when they get older and have their license, talking while they drive.

Suzie Hurst

Milan