After 14 years, he turns himself in

PERKINS TWP. His days as a fugitive are over. Donald Major walked into the Erie County Jail on Friday morning wearing
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

PERKINS TWP.

His days as a fugitive are over.

Donald Major walked into the Erie County Jail on Friday morning wearing a suit and tie. With his family by his side, he turned himself in on 14-year-old charges.

Major, 50, of Detroit, has been wanted by police since 1993 on felony charges of kidnapping, felonious assault and attempted murder.

"We've gone back and forth for several years trying to get this guy picked up," said Erie County Sheriff's Capt. Paul Sigsworth.

Major, who served time for 1995 federal convictions of conspiracy and distribution of cocaine, has been out of prison since 1998, said Kevin Baxter, Erie County prosecutor.

"He was picked up several times (in the past) but released by a judge or magistrate while the extradition process was ongoing," Sigsworth said.

It wasn't until two months ago, when Major was stopped for a traffic violation in Michigan, that he learned of the warrant, said his attorney, Maria Mannarino.

"He was released from custody without any indication of there being any outstanding warrants," Mannarino said. "He had no way of knowing this was still out there."

Major was released on bond for the traffic violation to allow him to turn himself into Ohio law enforcement, Mannarino said.

Major's charges stem from an August 1993 incident in which Corey Clark, then 23, was stabbed at a Buchanan Street apartment in an apparent drug-motivated crime.

Clark survived several cuts including a stab wound to the heart, police reported. Police believe Clark's father, Robert Coleman, was also kidnapped in the incident and taken to Toledo. Coleman was eventually released.

Major is being held on $55,000 bond -- the amount allowed by 1993 law -- and will be arraigned next week in Sandusky Municipal Court.

"He did turn himself in so that might bode well for him as far as bond's concerned," Baxter said.

Mannarino is not sure if she will represent Major in this case, but said she will be involved in the process in some way.

"We are prepared to resolve it and find out what all this is about," Mannarino said, adding that Major had been preparing to open his own restaurant in Michigan before turning himself in.