Army officer from Marblehead injured in Iraq

MARBLEHEAD U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Dorko, formerly of Marblehead, was injured Monday when a roa
JACOB LAMMERS
May 24, 2010

MARBLEHEAD

U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Dorko, formerly of Marblehead, was injured Monday when a roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle in Baghdad, according to CNN.com.

Dorko, 50, is thought to be the highest-ranking U.S. military officer injured in the war. He suffered shrapnel wounds and was flown to ahospital in Germany, his father, Ray Dorko said.

He said the wounds are "not life-threatening."

"He was going to check on a project, and that's when it happened," said Ray Dorko after aconversation with his son's wife, Amy. "He seemed alert. It sounds good so far."

Amy Dorko, who lives in Dallas, Texas, will head to Germany to see her husband, Ray Dorko said. Jeffrey and Amy have a 10-year-old daughter, Caroline.

Amy Dorko could not be reached for comment Monday.

Jeffrey Dorko took command of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Gulf Region Division, in Baghdad on Oct. 10, according to the Corps of Engineers Web site.

"You're always concerned when they're over there serving, and you just hope for the best," Ray Dorko said. "Being in the engineers, I thought that he wouldn't get into anything, but then again you never know."

Jeffrey Dorko graduated from Danbury High School in 1974 and graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1978. He then entered the military as an officer in the Army Corps of Engineers. Dorko's military career is a family affair.

Ray Dorko served in the U.S. Navy in WorldWar II from 1944-1946. His three older brothers served in the U.S. Army during World War II.

Jeffrey's brother, Maj. Dean Dorko, serves at the U.S. Army Field Artillery Center in Fort Sill, Okla.

"I don't really know what inspired him to go that way," Ray Dorko said. "I'm proud of him the way he's moved up in the military."

Jeffrey Dorko's work with the Gulf Region Division of the Corps of Engineers includes rebuilding the infrastructure to provide essential utility services and projects providing facilities for basic services in health care, transportation and education, according to the Corps of Engineers Web site.

--CNN.com contributed to this story.