Did you really have to call the cops on your kid?

From juveniles refusing to go to bed on time to sibling rivalry, the reasons parents call police to get their children under control
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

From juveniles refusing to go to bed on time to sibling rivalry, the reasons parents call police to get their children under control can run the gamut.

But despite some frivolous complaints, there are plenty of valid requests by parents for assistance with their children.

A little more than two weeks ago, on Sept. 25, a guardian called police when a 9-year-old boy held a steak knife to his brother's throat while he slept. That juvenile was charged with domestic violence.

The next day a 10-year-old boy was charged with two counts of domestic violence and a threat of domestic violence after hitting another child with a hammer, according to police.

Parents and guardians need to make a judgment call depending on the case, according to Charlie Sams, Sandusky police assistant chief.

"They have to weigh out thesituation," he said. "I'd rather they err on the side of caution."

There are two main categories for misbehaving youth, depending on the nature of the offense, according to Perkins police Lt. Robb Parthemore.

Unruly children are those who are breaking a rule imposed in their guardian's household. Delinquent children are those breaking the law.

Red flags for parents include if their child is showing signs of violence or threatening violence, or involved with criminal acts including stealing and using drugs, Sams said.

Officers often act as mediators in these situations.

"Sometimes we will sit down and counsel the kid if we think it will do any good," Parthemore said.

Sometimes an officer will refer the family to a domestic violence shelter or for counseling on serious matters.

Other times parents may just need to take more responsibility.

"Some parents are afraid to be parents," Parthemore said. "We as police officers can't parent the kids."