Help your neighbor

This is in response to the person who wrote concerning the half-way house going in at the end of their street. The writer acknowledg
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

This is in response to the person who wrote concerning the half-way house going in at the end of their street. The writer acknowledged that the former prisoners had a right to re-enter society and to a place to safely learn how to do so.

However, a concern was expressed because of children living on the street, and the proximity of the proposed ball diamonds for children's recreation. I don't know if there is any place in Sandusky, other than closed adult communities, in which there are no children. Returning prisoners must learn to live in "normal" society, which will include children. There is a need for a place away from the former environment, which led to imprisonment in the first place.

The skills learned in prison are still fragile, and need to be nurtured in a safe, caring place. These former prisoners want to learn how to live in law-abiding society, and don't want to return to prison. Neighbors who are willing to reach out to these people and help them learn to heal are essential to the process. From the description of the writer, it seems that the street where the house is to be located offers just such a place. The best way to deal with the writer's concerns is by helping the former prisoners learn the skills they need to move on from the half-way house to fully return to society as productive citizens. The neighbors of the house play a vital role in this process. I wish the writer the very best in meeting and helping the new neighbors to heal.

Helen A. Spalding

Bay View