Teens weigh in on obesity

MARGARETTA School is finally out and teenagers are starting to ease into the familiar idea of summer
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

MARGARETTA

School is finally out and teenagers are starting to ease into the familiar idea of summer vacation.

Top priorities may include a summer job, day trips to the beach or relaxing in the AC.

But daily exercises and workouts are usually not on the agenda.

Twenty years ago, only a slim 6 percent of children and teens in the United States and Canada were considered overweight. Over the years, an increase of 9 percent has led to an average rate of 15 percent of all teenagers and children being obese.

But Margaretta student Sydney Craig isn't planning on wasting her summer vacation away on the couch. Swimming, running and playing volleyball will be occupying a majority of her time. The reason?

"So I'm ready for all my school sports next year," Craig said.

"Some kids are just built big, but if it's because they don't care and don't exercise and live on a diet of fast food then it's their fault. They're the ones that don't want help," said student Courtney Balduff on the topic.

Todd Pooch, a high school health and physical education teacher at Margaretta, believes behavioral choices are to blame.

"Today's health of teenagers is declining due to the amount of junk food offered. Video games combined with the lack of physical activity is another main cause," Pooch said.

He also believes this era of young people are less motivated.

Most teens may actually be getting daily exercise without even knowing it, though. Dancing is a great workout and daily chores, such as yard work or cleaning, get your heartbeat going.

Another key factor to maintain a healthy weight is a healthy diet. Freddy Bodner, 15, is motivated to stay in shape so he can "look good and feel good." Although confessing his love of ice cream and Dr. Pepper, he has a somewhat healthy diet, minus "all the fast food and junk," he said.