Fair's fair in air

The Register offered a one-sided story on April 16 on potential changes in the Federal Aviation Administration funding process. Here
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

The Register offered a one-sided story on April 16 on potential changes in the Federal Aviation Administration funding process. Here are some additional facts to consider:

"FAA money comes with little oversight." This is not true. Navigating the FAA funding regulations requires more power than the best military GPS. Improvement work done at small airports is so expensive because of FAA rules that apply.

Funding government programs has never been popular with those not receiving direct benefit. I am not interested in my tax dollars going to pave a road in Missouri, but that's the way it works. If funding is cut for small airports, funding should also be cut to the Coast Guard, which helps regulate the ever-burgeoning small boat population on the Great Lakes.

It's too bad that Put -in-Bay had to erect a fence to keep golf carts off the runway. A better use of that money could have been to give those potential golf cart drivers an I.Q. test to see if they were able to pick out the difference between a runway and a golf cart path. The fence is protection for pilots. Golf cart drivers just get a free haircut if they get too close.

The Bush administration proposes aviation gasoline and jet fuel tax be increased to 70.1 cents per gallon. The current Federal automobile gas tax rate is 18.4 cents per gallon. So much for fairness.

Bush also wants to create an airline-dominated board to oversee the FAA. The airlines can't run themselves competently let alone running the FAA.

Many people do, indeed, view aviators as rich. This is far from the case. Let's consider the price of owning a classic car or a boat. This is America where we have the freedom to pursue the things we love to do.... including flying airplanes.

Griffing Airport is privately owned and gets NO FAA money.

Greg Bauman

Huron