Drug tests what's best

"Do what's best for the kids." We've heard it thousands of times. Every time someone wants to impress you with their conce
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

"Do what's best for the kids." We've heard it thousands of times. Every time someone wants to impress you with their concern for your schools this is always part of their speech. I said it as an eight-year elected member of the Western Reserve Board of Education. We interviewed people who said it, we hired people who said it and we fired people who said it. At some point in time every board member, administrator and employee of all our local schools have said it.

The Norwalk Schools have the opportunity to try to "do what's best for the kids" by implementing a drug testing program. There are no guarantees, just the chance to make a difference in the lives of young adults they agree to be responsible for every single day.

Some say it starts at home. Well, for some, school is the best home they know. Their extracurricular activities may be the only chance some young adults have to gain the skills to better prepare for life. We all have stories of teachers, coaches, bus drivers, etc., who have made a difference in our schools.

Some say it costs too much. What price do you put on saving even one young person? People say it is an invasion of privacy. If you have nothing to hide, no one is invading anything. Be part of the solution -- not the problem.

The saddest part of this controversial issue is the people deciding this issue who are against it but have personal stories of family, friends, relatives and neighbors who have been involved in drug related issues but still refuse to at least give this testing a try. Do you want these people responsible for our young adults on a daily basis? "Do what's best for the kids."

Mike Finnegan

Collins