Uniform standards

Sandusky City Schools will take a step toward setting uniform standards for all its high school students this fall by standardizing
Sandusky Register Staff
May 24, 2010

 

Sandusky City Schools will take a step toward setting uniform standards for all its high school students this fall by standardizing the dress code -- with uniforms.

Parents, students and teachers have had a while to digest this new rule since it was first suggested by the school board. A few parents and a larger number of students have voiced their objections. These complaints were heard and duly noted by the board, but the plusses outweighed the minuses and the uniform policy was passed.

Now that plans have been finalized, it's time to bite the bullet and prepare for making the policy a success.

Credit is due to the school board for recognizing one way to present Sandusky schools in a positive manner to an outside observer and prevent some of the problems rampant in the schools.

For a public school to require uniforms is a bold move, but one that many schools are making. Students have only themselves to thank (or blame) for the move. When dress codes are blatantly ignored and clothing choices are unacceptable for a school environment, the board is left with few choices.

One choice would have been to appoint someone to pass judgment on every student, every day as to whether their attire is suitable for a working environment. This choice is clearly full of flaws -- too expensive, too nit-picky, too time-consuming, too arbitrary.

The second choice is uniforms. They are inexpensive, easy to care for, and easy to judge -- either you're within the parameters or you're not.

Parents will no longer have the stress of school clothes shopping and students no longer will have the pressure of vying for the "best dressed" title. Alleged gang clothing will be eliminated, along with the Britney Spears mode of inappropriate dress.

If all the naysayers would calm down, they might be able to see the advantages of uniforms. With the pressure and expense of a school wardrobe gone, students will be free to more fluently express their individuality in after-school clothing. The high school game of clothing one-upmanship will be over.

An important lesson for students' future is brought out by uniforms. Make good professional wardrobe choices in presenting yourself in the workplace, or someone may do it for you.

Only one question: We know the idea is for the older kids to set an example, but why not institute the rules in elementary and junior high schools now, as well?